Think the closure of News Corp’s Papers local papers doesn’t affect you? Think again!

Last week News Corp announced dramatic changes to their local papers, after what has been called “a comprehensive review of its assets and observed consumers shifting to online news sources” .

Over 100 of News Corp’s regional and community titles will no longer produce print editions and instead move to digital-only formats. In addition, 14 titles will cease to exist.

You may be reading this post thinking, “yeah, well, I didn’t read the local “rag” anyway”…

Think about the bigger picture just for a minute.

These papers supported local journalists, local photographers, editors and in some instances welcomed high-school or university students for work-experience.

They were the institutions that shared the results of local sporting teams, listed local garage sales and classified listings.

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Collection of News Corp’s local papers (Image: Google)

It was also a FANTASTIC avenue for public relations consultants (like me) to generate exposure for clients on a local level. Having the support of the local community is critical to the success for businesses, especially in regional areas.

While a large portion of titles will move online, stories will likely be behind a paywall, while it’s not confirmed if a digital replica edition will be available on certain days of the week for any of these papers.

If your local paper is transitioning to a digital edition, I encourage you to continue to support those local journalists and provide them with your stories, (if you need assistance with this, we can help!) and achievements. They will, with your input keep our communities educated and informed.

 

 

Wrap-up from our press release basics

 

For those who aren’t “playing along” on Instagram, here’s what we have shared in terms of making your media release stand out!

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  • Have a template and keep it consistent
  • Keep your contact details current
  • Have the release in a format that suits the audience (editable word doc via email, PDF for your website)
  • A readable font – so important, please avoid using comic sans!
  • Include your logo
  • Have a strong headline
  • Have a summary of your release in your emails when sending
  • Check your website links in the release all work
  • Have someone proof-read your media release
  • Don’t use industry jargon if you can avoid it
  • Have confidence in your topic area, and ensure your spokesperson is across everything that’s in your media release

 

There is MUCH more that could be added to this list, to create a stand out media release and I’d love to share these details with you.

CLICK here to book a FREE 10 minute consult either via SKYPE, Facetime, or if you’re on the Coast face-to-face.

I have a number of other services available at competitive prices. I’d encourage you to check them out.

-Brooke

 

What makes a media release?

Over the coming days on Instagram we’re sharing just some of the components of a media release that will get noticed!

In coming up with this content, it reinforced to me what a multilayered “beast” the media release is.

Beyond the content, which is arguably the most important element, there’s so much more to a media release. JPEG image-4172F6698DF5-1

There’s the fact that you need to tailor it to HOW you’re distributing the release, there’s font consideration and so much more (we have allocated 10 days to it on Instagram!).

Do you need a media release for your business to share the news of a new product line in store?

Perhaps you’ve been selected for a local business award, certainly, THAT’s worth sharing!

Or maybe you’ve just managed to secure a top influencer online or a celebrity to promote your product!

Whatever it is, we can assist with your next media release. CLICK here to view how we can help. 

I look forward to sharing some tips with you and reading your feedback.

 

Worthwhile reading for when you’re writing your next press release

I stumbled across this post by Joe Ciarallo on PRNewser this morning.

The most overused press release buzzwords (updated)

At best this blog highlights one of the challenges faced by PR practitioners on a daily basis.

That of being able to craft a document which not only stands out but captures the attention of the journalist and the essence of what is being “sold”.

Here’s my three top tips:

  • I read the most recent press release I’ve sent on behalf of a client before beginning a new one – this way I know what words to include / exclude, style, tone etc
  • I always have a minimum of two others read over any document that is to be sent (with the exception of some emails)
  • I always have a thesaurus handy – both online and on my desk

I’d be interested in your practices as to how to overcome the challenges associated with crafting a press release.